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Fire & Water - Cleanup & Restoration

Flood Prevention in Large Cities

8/14/2019 (Permalink)

Thames barrier in England

Flood Prevention in Large Cities

High water levels after a storm can cause severe flood damage. Lowlands and coastal areas are particularly vulnerable.
Many paved areas do not have proper drainage, which can lead to a buildup of water on city streets. Even traditional levees and dams are insufficient.
While an emergency restoration services company can help with flood cleanup, preventing storm damage entirely ensures that businesses continue running after a weather disaster. That is why some cities have implemented advanced technologies to keep out floodwaters.

Oosterschelde, Hagestein Weir and Maeslantkering in the Netherlands

Since 60 percent of Holland's population lives below sea level, it is no surprise that the Netherlands is known for its incredible flood prevention systems. One of these is called the Oosterschelde, or the Eastern Scheldt Storm Surge Barrier. These movable gates helped lower the tidal height.
The Hagestein Weir, meanwhile, is a movable dam that blocks high water from the Rhine River. It features two arched gates that can be rotated open or closed. This weir has been in place since 1960 and has inspired similar structures around the world.
A more modern structure is the Maeslantkering, or Maeslant Storm Surge Barrier. It features tanks that fill up as water rises. The weight of this water then keeps the walls of the barrier closed.

Watergates in Japan

As an archipelago, Japan is also prone to flooding. The country thus utilizes canals and sluice-gate locks. It also has numerous water gates that contain hydraulic motors. These gates can thus continue running during power outages.

Thames Barrier in England

The Brits created a hollow steel barrier to block high water from the Thames River. The revolving gates typically remain open so ships can get through but close during major storms.
Perhaps some of these technologies will eventually make their way to Clementon, NJ. In the meantime, property owners will have to rely on more old-fashioned techniques to stop flooding and prevent the need for storm cleanup.

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